Roof Vent – MaxxAir 6200K

The roof vent in an integral part of the ventilation, cooling and insulation plans. Living in an RV, one constantly faces the issue of cooling & heating and lowering humidity levels. With only few choices, I decided to install a MaxxAir vent; its ability to remain open, when rain is pouring down, made it a clear winner over its competitor the Fan-Tastic vent.

Episode 1


These are the initial steps of installing a MaxxAir 6200K roof vent in the rear roof section of a 2016 Ford Transit LWB MR cargo van. I go really slow and show every bit of the work that’s involved in getting an acceptable result.



Episode 2


With a dark colored van, the white flange of the MaxxAir 6200K roof vent sticks out like a sore thumb. To adhere to the stealthy exterior of the vehicle. I decided to paint the plastic flange black before it was installed into the roof. The Thermoplastic material (TPO) does not accept any paint and while I could not get the right (industrial) paint, the combination of Adhesion Promotor and specialty trim paint, made this project a success.

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Episode 3


Adding a badly needed roof vent to the cargo van on a very hot and humid day. No rain in the forecast, but who believes that?

Episode 4


In this episode I drill a lot of holes, fit the adapters and clean up a lot. After the rain, I was still able to install the exterior adapter and have the sealant dry overnight.

Episode 5


This final part of the installation includes the interior adapter, the flange and the MaxxAir roof vent. It also shows in detail, the different types of sealants I use to glue everything together.

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You can find the step-by-step details, including downloadable guides on my Projects Page.

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6 thoughts on “Roof Vent – MaxxAir 6200K”

  1. I saw where you made the wooden adapter for the interior of the roof. Was the adapter that you put on the top of the roof a purchased adapter or one that you made?
    Thank you so much; your videos are absolutely awesome!

    1. Hi Laura,
      I’m not an expert at this, but I prefer SS as it is less prone to rust. They’re are usually more expensive, but if you buy on-line it can be cheaper than zinc from your local DIY store. I have a good experience with http://www.boltdepot.com (no affiliation).

      Van Williams

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